The physical model attains a certain immediacy that often eludes other modes of architectural representation.  Be it a sketch, a plan or 3d visualisation often the most effective mode of communication is through models. In fact models are inherently architectural, generating a conversation between space, light and material. Moreover they inhabit the very same space that our buildings will eventually occupy and as such can be used as an invaluable tool to test space and light through the passage of time. The act of model making itself requires decisions, conscious or otherwise on how components might join and whilst the material may not by a literal translation, i.e. cardboard could represent masonry, the expression of a joint may navigate into a design and it is this element of chance and iterative testing that we actively court within our design process.

 

As the practice expands we are increasingly reaping the benefits of model making. We try to use them through all stages of our designs, from concepts and massing, for client presentations and pre-applications through to presentation models and they are always a great centre piece for discussion. But these models are seldom finite, we welcome clients and planners alike to move and shift parts to help better form and evolve conversations.

Fig 1. Somerville House Concept Model

Fig 1. Somerville House Concept Model

There is an undeniable deep rooted relationship between the model and built form that stretches back centuries. Even on completion of the actual building the models are rarely disposed of. To the contrary they often take up an important role in the entry sequence of many great civic structures allowing visitors to simultaneously inhabit a part whilst attaining a sense of the whole. As our schemes continue to develop and emerge so too will our models!

Fig 2. Foam Models

Fig 2. Foam Models

By Chris.